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Private Placement Memorandums

 

Raising $1,000,000 to Unlimited Funds

Using A Non-Public Private Offering (Form D)
As Provided By The SEC Securities Act of 1933 and Regulation D 

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Regulation D Offerings

Under the Securities Act of 1933, any offer to sell securities must either be registered with the SEC or meet an exemption. Regulation D (or Reg D) contains three rules providing exemptions from the registration requirements, allowing some smaller companies to offer and sell their securities without having to register the securities with the SEC. For more information about these exemptions, read our publications on Rules 504, 505 and 506 of Regulation D.

While companies using a Reg D exemption do not have to register their securities and usually do not have to file reports with the SEC, they must file what’s known as a "Form D" after they first sell their securities. Form D is a brief notice that includes the names and addresses of the company’s executive officers and stock promoters, but contains little other information about the company.

If you are thinking about investing in a Reg D company, you should access EDGAR Company Search to determine whether the company has filed Form D. If the company has filed a Form D, you can request a copy. If the company has not filed a Form D, this should alert you that the company might not be in compliance with the federal securities laws

You should always check with your state securities regulator to see if they have more information about the company and the people behind it. Be sure to ask whether your state regulator has cleared the offering for sale in your state. You can get the address and telephone number for your state securities regulator by calling the North American Securities Administrators Association at (202) 737-0900 or by visiting its website. You’ll also find this information in the state government section of your local phone book.

For more information about the SEC’s registration requirements and common exemptions, read the SEC brochure, Q&A: Small Business & the SEC.

Rule 504 of Regulation D

Rule 504 of Regulation D provides an exemption from the registration requirements of the federal securities laws for some companies when they offer and sell up to $1,000,000 of their securities in any 12-month period.

A company can use this exemption so long as it is not a blank check company and does not have to file reports under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Also, the exemption generally does not allow companies to solicit or advertise their securities to the public, and purchasers receive "restricted" securities, meaning that they may not sell the securities without registration or an applicable exemption.

Rule 504 does allow companies to sell securities that are not restricted, if one of the following circumstances is met:

Even if a company makes a private sale where there are no specific disclosure delivery requirements, a company should take care to provide sufficient information to investors to avoid violating the antifraud provisions of the securities laws. This means that any information a company provides to investors must be free from false or misleading statements. Similarly, a company should not exclude any information if the omission makes what is provided to investors false or misleading.

While companies using the Rule 504 exemption do not have to register their securities and usually do not have to file reports with the SEC, they must file what is known as a "Form D" after they first sell their securities. Form D is a brief notice that includes the names and addresses of the company’s owners and stock promoters, but contains little other information about the company.

If you are thinking about investing in a company making a Rule 504 offering, you should access EDGAR Company Search to determine whether the company has filed Form D. If the company has filed a Form D, you can request a copy. If the company has not filed a Form D, this should alert you that the company might not be in compliance with the federal securities laws.

You should always check with your state securities regulator to see if it has more information about the company and the people behind it. Be sure to ask whether your state regulator has cleared the offering for sale in your state. You can get the address and telephone number for your state securities regulator by calling the North American Securities Administrators Association at (202) 737-0900 or by visiting its website. You’ll also find this information in the state government section of your local phone book.

For more information about the SEC’s registration requirements and common exemptions, read the SEC brochure, Q&A: Small Business & the SEC.

Rule 505 of Regulation D

Rule 505 of Regulation D allows some companies offering their securities to have those securities exempted from the registration requirements of the federal securities laws. To qualify for this exemption, a company:

Rule 505 allows companies to decide what information to give to accredited investors, so long as it does not violate the antifraud prohibitions of the federal securities laws. But companies must give non-accredited investors disclosure documents that generally are the same as those used in registered offerings. If a company provides information to accredited investors, it must make this information available to non-accredited investors as well. The company must also be available to answer questions by prospective purchasers.

 

Here are some specifics about the financial statement requirements applicable to this type of offering:

While companies using the Rule 505 exemption do not have to register their securities and usually do not have to file reports with the SEC, they must file what is known as a "Form D" after they first sell their securities. Form D is a brief notice that includes the names and addresses of the company’s owners and stock promoters, but contains little other information about the company.

 

If you are thinking about investing in a company making a Rule 505 offering, you should access EDGAR Company Search to determine whether the company has filed Form D. If the company has filed a Form D, you can request a copy.   If the company has not filed a Form D, this should alert you that the company might not be in compliance with the federal securities laws.

 

You should always check with your state securities regulator to see if it has more information about the company and the people behind it. Be sure to ask whether your state regulator has cleared the offering for sale in your state. You can get the address and telephone number for your state securities regulator by calling the North American Securities Administrators Association at (202) 737-0900 or by visiting its website. You’ll also find this information in the state government section of your local phone book.

 

For more information about the SEC’s registration requirements and common exemptions, read our brochure, Q&A: Small Business & the SEC.

Rule 506 of Regulation D

Rule 506 of Regulation D is considered a "safe harbor" for the private offering exemption of  Section 4(2) of the Securities Act. Companies using the Rule 506 exemption can raise an unlimited amount of money. A company can be assured it is within the Section 4(2) exemption by satisfying the following standards:

While companies using the Rule 506 exemption do not have to register their securities and usually do not have to file reports with the SEC, they must file what is known as a "Form D" after they first sell their securities. Form D is a brief notice that includes the names and addresses of the company’s owners and stock promoters, but contains little other information about the company.

If you are thinking about investing in a company making a Rule 506 offering, you should access EDGAR Company Search to determine whether the company has filed Form D. If the company has filed a Form D, you can request a copy. If the company has not filed a Form D, this should alert you that the company might not be in compliance with the federal securities laws.

You should always check with your state securities regulator to see if it has more information about the company and the people behind it. Be sure to ask whether your state regulator has cleared the offering for sale in your state. You can get the address and telephone number for your state securities regulator by calling the North American Securities Administrators Association at (202) 737-0900 or by visiting its website. You’ll also find this information in the state government section of your local phone book.

For more information about the SEC’s registration requirements and common exemptions, read the SEC brochure, Q&A: Small Business & the SEC.

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